Prosthetic Aesthetics

"Man has, as it were, become a kind of prosthetic God. When he puts on all his auxiliary organs, he is truly magnificent; but those organs have not grown on him and they still give him much trouble at times." Sigmund Freud

Public Assembly: Part Three – Thames Platform

The second project presented in the Public Assembly essay, the Thames Platform continues the idea of an inhabitable modular sculpture that reflects the changing physical environment of the city, in this case the rise and fall of the Thames river.

THAMES PLATFORM

On the route of the 19 bus.

This installation extends London onto the Thames, a tidal river that rises and falls eight metres between high and low tides.  The transformation of kinetic structures is investigated to create a system that can slowly unfold throughout the day, creating a set of dynamic public spaces and enclosures.

The platforms are fixed at street level but float on the river, pivoting to accommodate changing river levels. At high tide, they stretch out to form a public viewing platform across the river and for London Heliport. At low tide, the platforms provide public access to the Thames beach. Throughout the seasons, the constructed platforms perform a slow dance on the river, a water clock that transforms the changing tides into inhabitable space.

The Thames Platform is bridges the riverside walkway with the usually inaccessible river bed, a part of a public art strategy for London

The platforms are fixed at street level but float on the river, pivoting to accomodate changing river levels.

At high tide, they stretch out to form a public viewing platform across the river and for London Heliport.

At low tide, the platforms provide public access to the Thames beach.

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This entry was posted on October 17, 2012 by in Architecture, Art, Design, Installation, London, Sculpture and tagged , , , , , , , , , .

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